Adulthood is a Fish Tale

Adulthood is a Fish Tale

 

 

 

If you’ve been fishing and if you’ve been in your early twenties, then you might appreciate today’s connection. This summer has been a big deal for the oldest kids in our family—new jobs, new homes, birthdays, and a wedding all mean our twenty-somethings are official adults. To commemorate all this growing up, here are five ways that fishing is just like being under thirty.

 

  1. You’ve just got to stick your hand in the worm container if you’re going to bait your hook. It’s kind of nasty, particularly if it’s a bucket of fat bloodworms. Whether you’re trying to bait your hook or make a huge life decision, you have to eventually stop considering your options and get your hands dirty. You have to eat, right?
  2. Once you cast your hook, you have to wait. You can’t rush the fish; they’ll bite when they’re ready. You can’t rush job offers, promotions, relationships, home closings, or your ramen noodles in the microwave either. They’ll all come when the time is right. Sit tight and take in the scenery where you are.
  3. Despite your best intentions, you occasionally hook yourself in the hand. Few things are more miserable than trying to pull a barbed hook out of your skin. You’ll survive—you may cuss like a sailor, but you’ll make it. When relationships fail, loved ones pass on, your first job ends, or a really cool opportunity goes to someone else, the barbs rip your guts a little. Welcome to real life. You can swear, cry, or punch a wall, as long as you know how to spackle so you can get the deposit back on your rental. The sooner you take the hook out of your heart and move on, though, the less likely it is that a paralyzing infection will set in.
  4. Adulthood is just a fish story. Ever since you were a kid, you’ve had yourself convinced that adulthood was cooler than the two-story whale your Uncle Skippy swore he landed single-handedly in his twelve foot skiff in the middle of a 50-knot gale. Oh, how you’ll love telling your rule-proclaiming parents to stick it and finally get your own place. You can come and go when you want, buy what you want, blast Lil’ Wayne until the rafters shake, and, for the love of all that’s holy, stop all that flossing nonsense. It’s all fun and games until the light bill comes and all your teeth fall out, though.
  5. You finally reel in a big one! After all the worms, baiting, waiting, and bleeding, you find yourself walking down the aisle to marry the person of the dreams. You get the call offering you the job you’ve always wanted. You hold your baby for the first time. Your realtor hands you the keys to your first little house. You get a really cool dog. Your ramen noodles don’t stick to the pan. Landing a “big fish,” regardless of size or magnitude, feels pretty sweet. Experience will tell you your parents weren’t wrong when they told you that adulthood isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. In fact, you might be realizing that your parents weren’t wrong about a lot of that cheeseball crap they told you all those years. But like the rest of us old people who’ve walked the road before you, you’ll find that, despite the bumps, worms, and hooks, you’re really rocking this adulthood thing!

Stay tuned for some interesting up-coming profiles of career connectors and creative connectors coming up soon!

This blog is linked up with the Saturday Sharefest! Check out that site for some interesting writing! It is also linked to https://www.floydfamilyhomestead.com/2016/08/10/homesteader-hop-15

Adulthood is Just a Fish Story

0 thoughts on “Adulthood is a Fish Tale

  • August 8, 2016 at 2:27 am
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    Love this metaphor, Jennifer! Especially #2. So many of us feel like we need to see immediate progress in our careers from a short amount of hard work. Often, it takes a lot longer than that. Great post! 🙂

    Reply
    • August 8, 2016 at 2:59 am
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      Thank you so much for visiting! Immediate gratification doesn’t always occur, does it?

      Reply

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